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Perception Deception . Fall 2019

Human brains are trained to recognize objects by observing the relationship among a set of cues. This experiment shows that when it comes to object recognition, humans rely on hierarchy i.e., they unconsciously prioritize certain cues over the others. Perception is thus ultimately defined by how the brain processes these relationships.

The piece Perception Deception explores hierarchy and interaction of lighting and intensity, color and contrast, and edges, with the goal of creating a confounding experience that leaves the viewers questioning whether the image they are seeing is pushed in or out, i.e., does it look more like a cube or like a book? The piece is built inside a 16” x 18” box in the MIT Museum Kompton Gallery. It has three layers: the backdrop of programmed LED lights, a vellum diffuser made out of closely packed cylinders, and the front cap with the cutouts.

The piece was exhibited during Spring 2019.

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